Couture | Iris van Herpen plays with the “Games of Nature”

Ludi Naturae: our world as seen by a bird's-eye view

in brief

Iris van Herpen presented her latest Couture collection this morning at the Galerie de Minéralogie et de Géologie in Paris. The collection was inspired by the designer’s reflections on the world’s formations from a microscopic point of view.

Following her original inspiration of an examination of the natural and manmade landscapes of our world, from a bird’s-eye view, Van Herpen collaborated with Dutch artist Peter Gentenaar, known for capturing “organic memory” and motion in his delicate large-scale cellulose sculptures. For the show, the artist created a site-specific floating installation, which blossomed around the garments as the models came onto the runway.

A vivid & optimistic collection, fusing the artificial with the organic

The collection blends a natural color palette of blurred and faded greens, yellows, blues and purples with skin colors and blacks. The 21 silhouettes feature boundary-pushing construction and innovative material techniques.

260 hours to 3D print the “Foliage Dress” thanks to PolyJet printing technique

The Foliage Dress was 3D printed thanks to the PolyJet printing technique.

The show opened with the technically most interesting piece, a dress that took 260 hours to 3D print! The dress was printed using the PolyJet technique, which allows to create high-quality resin parts, with a smooth surface. It kind of works like a 2D inkjet printer: the printer projects small drops of a photopolymer liquid which is instantly cured thanks to UV light (learn more about 3D printing techniques in our 3D printing Guide).

Initiated with the Delft University of Technology, the “Foliage” process was used to print leaf-like patterns as thin as 0.8 mm. Tulle was then laid into the 3D printer to print directly onto the fabric, creating exceptional softness. To do so, researchers developed a parametric model to translate 2D patterns into 3D data. Three variations of this material were altered on droplet level, achieving the color and transparency. Fusing precisely controlled digital 3D modeling and the less predictable analog nature of deformation.

“Data Dust”: computationally distorted parametric patterns

The “Data Dust” Dress, picture by Yannis Vlamos.

For the “Data Dust” pieces (amongst which this mezmerizing Kimono Dress), Van Herpen computationally distorted parametric patterns, then foam-lifted, laser-cut and heat-bonded onto an invisible silk tulle, creating radiant and captivating glitches.

Silk changeant organza, the Ludi Naturae Dress

Closing the show, the Ludi Naturae Dress, worn by Korean influencer Soo Joo Park, is made of a silk changeant organza, mylar and velvet that were heat-bonded, laser-cut and wire-boned, creating a voluminous slow motion splash.

💜 @soojmooj @irisvanherpen #irisvanherpen

Une publication partagée par Noémie Balmat 卓兒 (@futur.exe) le

Data Dust Dress, picture by Yannis Vlamos.

Data Dust Jumpsuit and Headpiece, picture by Yannis Vlamos.

Decrypt Kymono: an inverted (where negative space becomes positive) parametrically drawn pattern that gradually dissolves into microscopic bits is foam-lifted, laser-cut and then heat-bonded onto invisible silk tulle, scattering the fabric’s drape. Picture by Yannis Vlamos.

Decrypt Dress and Foliage asymetric necklace, picture by Yannis Vlamos.

Entropy Gown: nude leather and black liquid fabric bonded to mylar, are individually laser-cut into perforated diminishing patterns that are interwoven, creating interlocking gradients from leather to voluminous drape. Picture by Yannis Vlamos.

Shift Souls Dress: an inverted (where negative space becomes positive) parametrically drawn pattern that gradually dissolves into microscopic bits is foam-lifted, laser-cut and then heat-bonded onto invisible silk tulle, scattering the changeant silk’s drape. Picture by Yannis Vlamos.

Ludi Naturae Dress, picture by Yannis Vlamos.

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