PFW | 3D printed dresses & holographic panels at Iris van Herpen AW16 show

in brief

Iris van Herpen just unveiled her AW16 collection in Paris this afternoon in Maison des Métallos, a long-time ago music instruments manufacture. True to herself, our favorite fashion designer unveiled intricate 3D printed dresses and holographic-like fabrics.

Iris van Herpen just unveiled her AW16 collection in Paris this afternoon in Maison des Métallos, a long-time ago music instruments manufacture. True to herself, our favorite fashion designer unveiled intricate 3D printed dresses and holographic-like fabrics.

The set design features holographic panels, making the models look double. The 3D printed dresses were made in collaboration with 3D artist Niccolo Casas. In the search for dynamic properties combined with aesthetic complexity and structural variation, Van Herpen and Casas have fused technology with handicraft: the collection features two 3D printed Magma dresses that combine flexible TPU printing, creating a fine web together with polyamide rigid printing.

All the components are unique; they differentiate – changing in shape and direction – depending on the body’s position so as to adapt and amplify according to the model’s movement. In this way, the creative duo investigated not only new aesthetic performances but also new elegant interactions between the body and garments through the use of technology. Overcoming the earlier ideas of sculptural shells, they are developing a series of techniques in order to infer dynamic properties while still maintaining all the “sculptural” advantages that 3D printing offers.

The Magma dress represents a further step on the path that started with the magnetic Motion Dress (2015 Magnetic Motion Collection). The dress is in fact not only a dynamic combination of 3D printed rigid components, but a system that merges 3D printed flexible and rigid materials with traditional craftsmanship; one of the dresses is in fact stitched from 6.052 3D printed elements. The other dress, on the contrary, loses its rigid elements so as to evidence a light and delicate 3D printed flexible lace that gently shapes itself to the body’s curvatures. Eventually, the evolution of 3D printed fashion will reside not only in the evolution of digital design techniques and material experimentation, but also in the traditional craftsmanship integration.
Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen, Fashion Show, Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen, Fashion Show, Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen, Fashion Show, Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen, Fashion Show, Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris

Iris Van Herpen Fashion Show Ready To Wear Collection Fall Winter 2016 in Paris


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Post written by Noémie Balmat, Founding editor-in-chief

Interested in the future of fashion, the digital revolutions and advertising, Noémie has a valuable three-year experience in international advertising agencies and works with young innovative designers as a fashion tech freelance consultant. Currently working for Soon Soon Soon as an Innovation consultant, she launched Clausette Magazine in November 2014 to gather cool projects linking fashion & innovation in one place. Sensitive to the technological and scientific evolutions, she takes part in several Fashion Tech weeks and events as a speaker (Who’s Next, WEAREABLE by Showroom Privé, FashionTech Days…).

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